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ESPN3 To Carry Spring Game April 13

ESPN3 To Carry Spring Game April 13

GREENSBORO, N.C. --- A total of nine spring football games of teams that will compete for the 2013 Atlantic Coast Conference Football Championship and a trip to Charlotte for the 2013 ACC Football Championship Game will be available on ESPN3 this spring, ESPN and the ACC announced Wednesday.

The games begin with Virginia's spring game on April 6 (1 p.m.) and will conclude on April 20 with the annual Kay Yow Spring Game at NC State (1:30 pm) and the Virginia Tech spring game (3 p.m.).

Included will be spring games from six Coastal Division teams in Duke (Apr. 13), Miami (Apr. 13), North Carolina (Apr. 13), Pittsburgh (Apr. 12), Virginia and Virginia Tech.

Pittsburgh, along with Syracuse, will officially join the Atlantic Coast Conference on July 1 of this year and will compete for the 2013 ACC Football title.

Atlantic Division teams with spring games on ESPN3 include Clemson (Apr. 13), Florida State (Apr. 13) and NC State.

ACC Spring Games on ESPN3 (in chronological order):
Saturday, Apr. 6-Virginia, 1 p.m., ESPN3
Friday, Apr. 12-Pittsburgh, 7 p.m., ESPN3
Saturday, Apr. 13-Florida State, 2 p.m., ESPN3
Saturday, Apr. 13-Miami, 3 p.m., ESPN3
Saturday, Apr. 13-North Carolina, 3 p.m., ESPN3
Saturday, Apr. 13-Clemson, 4 p.m., ESPN3
Saturday, Apr. 13-Duke, 4 p.m., ESPN3
Saturday, Apr. 20-NC State (Kay Yow Spring Football Game), 1:30 p.m., ESPN3
Saturday, Apr. 20-Virginia Tech, 3 p.m., ESPN3

About ESPN3--ESPN3 is ESPN's live multi-screen sports network, a destination that delivers thousands of global sports events annually and accessible online via WatchESPN.com, on smartphones and tablets via the WatchESPN app and through ESPN on Xbox LIVE to Gold members.  It is currently available to more than 85 million homes at no additional cost to fans who receive their high-speed Internet connection or video subscription from an affiliated service provider. The network is also available at no cost to approximately 21 million U.S. college students and U.S.-based military personnel via computers connected to on-campus educational networks and on-base military networks.